Birth Control and Abstinence

Talk to Me

You know birth control is out there and you know how it works and, sure, you know abstinence is a form of birth control. But do you know how to teach the effectiveness of these methods in an inclusive way? Do you know what actually works? We all like our options, can you name everything currently available? Would you like to know?

Wide Open Spaces

There’s nothing to hide or be ashamed of – birth control and abstinence should be a part of everyday conversation and you want to get it out in the open. In fact, you believe young people should have a positive attitude surrounding birth control and abstinence. We think you’re right. You’re here to learn how to teach in a way that allows them to weigh their options and make informed decisions surrounding these protection methods.

On a Mission

We’ve consulted key players – medical professionals, trainers, classroom teachers, youth serving professionals, public health workers, and researchers – to style this class for you in today’s world. Learn to teach in a relevant, inclusive way – one that resonates directly with young people’s communities. Engage them in sex-positive conversations encouraging body autonomy, building confidence.

Get Out the Compass

Help young people navigate all forms of birth control and learn what will work best for them. The more knowledge we can impart together, the more common these areas of everyday life will become.

All By Myself?

Never. Self-guided doesn’t mean we leave you hanging, we want you to be a part of the conversation as much as you do. So, we’ve included handy self-assessments throughout each course to ensure you become a master of information.

What’s the plan?

To learn.

  • Identify key teaching concepts for birth control and abstinence
  • Explain how to create and adapt inclusive lessons about birth control and abstinence
  • Describe the benefit of teaching about sexual abstinence and why abstinence may not be 100% effective
  • Describe traditional abstinence-only education and why it is both ineffective and non-inclusive
  • Identify important factors one should consider when selecting a birth control method and where to find reliable, medically accurate information
  • Explain how hormonal birth control, barriers, and other methods prevent pregnancy
  • Describe how to use a condom in a demonstration
Spark*ED Icon

Spark*ED will be available to educators in Spring 2020.
For more information, please contact sparked@ppgnhi.org.